July 14, 2018

Solar Roasted Corn on the Cob

We've gotten a lot of rain so far this summer, which has meant a lot of cloudy days. On sunny days, though, I like to get out my solar oven and put it to work. One summer favorite is solar roasted corn on the cob.


Roasting ears of corn in a solar oven is absolutely the easiest way to enjoy corn on the cob! No husking, washing, or trying to pick off corn silk. Just put them on the rack and let the sun do the work.

As with all solar cooking, time varies according to oven temperature. Mine usually gets up to about 350°F (180°C), and I think I left the corn in there about an hour. Since solar is even, moist heat, there is no worry about burning.

When you're ready to eat, remove them from the oven and cut the bottom end off.


Grasp the leaves at the top and peel them off from the bottom up.


They come off easily including the silk.

And that's it! No hot steamy pot to heat up the kitchen, just tender delicious corn to eat and enjoy. Nothing could be easier.

13 comments:

Donna OShaughnessy said...

Solar oven. Don't have one. Want one. Must put on my Christmas list. Our sweet corn is not near ready. A couple more weeks and I'll likely through it on an open fire after soaking in a bucket (husks and all) for a couple hours. Your way looks much easier.

Leigh said...

Donna, solar ovens are expensive but really make it worth it. The best part is not heating up the kitchen, but it's amazing how much better solar cooked food tastes. It's something you have to try to believe. That being said, I've never tried fire roasting corn! Dan does a lot of hardwood hot smoking of our meat, but we've never tried corn on that either.

Kristina said...

A solar oven is on my wish list. That corn looks delicious.

Woolly Bits said...

we did have a really hot month here, but I think a solar oven would be a waste of money in our usual climate:) and of course, as soon as I put up my jars for solar dyeing - the normal irish summer is back with grey clouds, wind, drizzle - and temps around 16 or 17 deg. C:) on the other hand, I'd have to buy in the sweetcorn anyway, so no point in complaining:) and we do need the rain....

Ed said...

That method does look nice and easy!

Leigh said...

Kristina, they are pricey and there is a learning curve, but I've been really glad to have taken the plunge. I know I don't use it to its fullest potential, but it's been a great cooking resource.

Bettina, no, they don't work very well without sun! We've had a lot of rain and cloudy days here so far this summer, so my solar cooking has been limited. Other years I use it a lot.

Ed, indeed!

Meg Hopeful said...

We don't have a solar oven but I have been on a course where one was used to cook a quiche! We certainly have the right kind of Summer weather here for one. I will have to investigate ... Meg:)

Mrs Shoes said...

The day I found out I could cook corn inside it's wrapping was a very happy day.

Leigh said...

Meg, I make crustless quiche and omelets in mine. The flavor is really exceptional with solar cooking. There is a bit of a learning curve, but it's a wonderful way to cook and a nice prepper backup.

Mrs. Shoes, LOL. Anything for easier cooking!

Cozy Thyme Cottage said...

Yum! And so easy too! Lucky you! Nancy

Leigh said...

Nancy, thanks!

Paula said...

I've been wanting a solar oven for awhile now, but don't have the storage space for the cloudy months October through May, sometimes June. But it would work all summer!

Leigh said...

Paula, yes, it is kind of clunky to store! I have a place on my back porch for it, but if it wasn't for that I don't know where I'd keep it either. Maybe the carport. If you ever figure it out, it's a great way to cook. And actually, as long as you have sun you can use it. It isn't so much dependent on air temperature and sun. I don't use mine in winter because I have a wood cookstove, but I would otherwise.