November 10, 2016

Windows for the Little Barn

I promised details on the new goat barn windows in my "Little Things on the Little Barn" post. Here they are.

Front windows in the goat barn.

For windows for the Little Barn, Dan had the idea to use the metal panels he removed when we re-roofed it. Some of the panels were rusted out, but there was quite a bit of good metal.

At first he planned to make frames for the panels, but after cutting out the first opening, he realized he could cover the plywood cut-outs with the metal.

Back windows from the inside.

So how were we going to hold them open? Hardware for upward-opening cabinet doors ranges from $18 - 20 each. Of course we didn't want to spend that much and in the end Dan came up with something much simpler.




The screw rests on the bottom of the window opening and holds the window open. The two screws means we can adjust the windows.


His first idea for securing the windows shut was to use some barrel bolt latches he had lying around.


Other latches were made with eye and machine bolts.


Both types secure the windows shut.


I plan to protect the metal with some kind of clear coating. Also I need to paint the rest of the trim and give the whole building a second coat of barn paint. Then we'll be ready for whatever the weather has to offer.

Needless to say I am really happy with these windows!


21 comments:

  1. Well done Mistress of reuse or sing the blues strikes again! I love how you and Dan make that a priority. We also do it and have for years. I am always delighted to meet like minded folks. Too many people even in my age bracket just want new. And usually it is not as well made as what lurks in the garage or shop. I imagine Dan may be like Geoffrey who has a supply of items and it often comes from his late father's stash from his last garage. So it is old, reusable and a tad of emotional attachment too.

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    1. Trying to get out of that "buy it" mindset is a hard habit to break. For us, not having much money has been a motivator to seeing how we can make do without buying everything! Turns out it's fun to be creative and then there's always a bit of history or a story behind each part that gives the whole thing uniqueness and (I think) personality!

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  2. Love the recycling. Clever Dan - looks great!

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  3. What simple, workable solutions. Our chicken house inside the big tobacco barn needs better ventilation in the heat of summer. These 'windows' are just the idea we needed. Thank you.

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    1. You're welcome! For chickens I would probably cover the opening with hardware cloth, mostly to keep varmints out at night.

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  4. Looking good. I know you don't get rain anymore but are you planning on putting some sort of lip above them to shed water running down the siding over the panels? I noticed the inside of the plywood was unfinished.

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    1. That's a good point Ed, and at this time it's a "wait and see." Most of our rain hits the side with no windows, although it can come from any direction. I still have to finish with quite a bit of painting which will at least help protect the wood.

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  5. I know many people wouldn't agree, but I think things like those that you and Dan do to use what's available, make-do, etc. are what gives character, individualism, and just plain "home-i-ness" to a place. I love small (unusual) spaces we've made available for storage, the step up into my quilting room (which was a small shed on the property originally which we attached to the house, etc.). I'd so much rather live in an environment that shows the personality of its owners than in a brand, spanking new, architecturally designed (and sterile, to my mind) place. (So there!) ;o)

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    1. Our neighbors would probably be on the list of those who don't agree. :)

      I love that you attached a former shed to your house to make a quilting room! Brilliant!

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    2. Thanks Mama Pea for sharing. Now as the fiber/guestroom becomes crowded I know just what the next step is. Good job!

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  6. Looks great. I too love the character old reused things give a place.

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    1. I'm really pleased with how they turned out.

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  7. I'm happy with those windows too. BRILLIANT! I am always amazed at what my hubby can come up with , hidden in the recesses of his "shop" (the old house on our property) that he can use for similar projects like your Dan works on. These guys are fantastic aren't they?

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    1. Definitely fantastic. Sure makes our lifestyle more fun and more aesthetic. :)

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  8. That's ingenious! Or as they say "necessity is the mother of invention"? Nice job!!!

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  9. All those finicky details, are being finished up nicely. Great use of resources and ingenuity too. I like the industrial look of metal, and wouldn't want to paint them. Those windows have such character. Well done to you both. :)

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