July 4, 2016

Shed Roof by Halvsies

Continued from "The Old Goat Shed: Roof It Or Lose It."

Dan is making progress on the old goat shed re-roofing project.

Framing and roof rafters for the extension of the shed

Nailers

The nailers are oak, given to us by the fellow from whom Dan bought his sawmill. They were cut on that same mill.

Metal roofing panels

Originally we were going to get the same metal roofing panels that we put on the chicken coop. They were corrugated metal panels from Lowes. That was a little over two years ago, and we discovered that what is being sold there now is a lighter weight panel; too light, really, for a roof. Most metal roofs are at least 29 gauge, more often 26 (the smaller the number the thicker the panel.) Customer reviews said the lighter panels are extremely thin and easily dented or bent. Not that Lowes advertised it, but we found out that their panels are now 30 or 31 gauge. We feared one fallen pecan tree branch would trash the roof. Dan started calling around to price panels.

In years past we've tried to support local businesses when we could, but usually ended up at the big box stores for big projects because of the limits of our budget. Dear Readers, we've discussed worsening quality before (in the comments in this post) and most folks agree poor quality is becoming a universal problem. I say this is an unfortunate consequence of our current economic system, because their definition of success is "growth," i.e. ever-increasing profits. Ideally that comes from selling more product, but when sales drop other measures must be taken to maintain that precious growth: raise prices, spend less on materials and inventory (cheaper quality), cut services, cut wages, or lay off workers. It's why the system is ultimately doomed to fail. The only hope would be for manufacturers and businesses to be content with simply providing a product or service and making a living, but we all know that ain't gonna happen. However, as prices go up and quality goes down at the large scale chain stores, the small local business, with lower overhead and no investors to please, is able to be competitive.

Anyway, we found a little place in town that cuts and sells metal panels. Our 29-gauge galvalume panels were cut to order and about 20¢ cheaper per square foot than the flimsy big-box panels!

As to the title of this blog post, why roof by halvsies? Well, when Dan removed the remaining fascia board off the back of the shed he discovered that the ends of many of the original rafters were rotted. By roofing the newly extended half first, we'll be able to keep everything (including the goats) undercover while he repairs and roofs the second half.

Here it is so far:

It reflects a lot of light - I like that.

First half paneled. This shot shows an overhang for what will be a door.

Eventually a wall will be built along the posts and girder in the above photo. The goat door will be under the overhang which will protect it from rain and mud (something we've had a lot of problems with in the past). The goats' area will be more than doubled once we're done, and I'll have plenty of room for milking, feed processing, and storage of goat stuff too.

The second half will be more complicated because of the structural repair I mentioned. You can read all about that here.

Shed Roof by Halvsies © June 2016 by

24 comments:

Chris said...

It looks really good so far. Pretty inventive to fix one side and move everything over, in order to repair the other side. I can only hope when you start pulling the other side apart, the damage won't be more extensive than already feared.

Do you think you'll have it all done, before next winter? All things going well that is. ;)

Theresa said...

Wood is a bit cheaper here I think than average nation wide. With Boise Cascade & Georgia Pacific cutting timber all over the northwest we have numerous plywood and sawmills. Metal however is expensive everywhere. Glad you found a local source with good quality and price. I marvel that the pitch is so shallow and then remember you don't have to shed feet of heavy wet snow. We have to build everything around here to at least an 80lb snow load. In the Sierra's it is 120lb I think and that may go up or down depending on elevation.

Farmer Barb said...

The typical pitch for a roof here is 12 over 12. My sheep sheds have a 2 over 12 because they are only 6' x 6'. I don't build up much snow on them. I am agreed that roofing materials should not be purchased just anywhere. Quality is everything unless you want to be doing it again soon...

Fiona said...

Are you going to add gutters? I had them on my old barn, I found them at a salvage yard, they really helped stop mud build up and I caught the water for the garden. I used salvaged pvc pipe to take the water about 20 feet away from the barn to barrels.
The other thing we are doing here is when we pick rocks from the garden we dump them along the tobacco barn that has no gutter. The rocks are not big and there are not a lot of them but it is helping. Your rebuild looks so good.

PioneerPreppy said...

Looking good. Always best to buy the thickest metal roofing you can find and afford that's for sure. It is amazing how everything is new and improved for the companies profit these days.

Leigh said...

Right now we're just trying to get the roof on. After that, Dan wants to get a floor down for the hay storage area (can't store hay on concrete - it sweats). Goat area and milking room next. Walls last! I hope we get all that done by next winter. :)

Leigh said...

You're right about snow, Theresa, which means we can have a shallower pitch on our outbuildings!

All of the lumber here is really poor qualty, which is one reason Dan bought his sawmill! It's nice that we don't need a lot for this project.

Leigh said...

12:12! That's some pitch! We researched roof pitch when we worked on our barn design, but of course snow isn't as much of an issue here. Typically we get 3 or 4 inches per winter if any.

Leigh said...

When Dan first worked on drainage for this building years ago, he dug a trench and filled it with stone. The chickens scratched up all that stone and scattered it all over the place! They even managed to move bricks. LOL

On the updated shed we will eventually add gutters and rainwater catchment.

Leigh said...

We've noticed that there are a lot of "extras" on offer for underlayments. I would definitely insulate a roof for a house, but I'm not worried about the outbuildings. Sometimes though, it's hard to know what's essential and what's a gimmick to get your money.

Mountain Mama said...

Lots of progress being made around your home, Leigh! What do the goats think of their new digs?

Leigh said...

Ha! The goats have no opinion. Unless, that is, they are put into the other pasture with the gate shut so they can't get to the shed. Sometimes Dan has to keep them out when he's working in their area. They do not like that! But they tend to be nosy and get into stuff, so a work area is usually off limits for goats.

Renee Nefe said...

I'm so happy to hear that you were able to find better quality roofing from a local supplier. The new roof is looking great. I hope that the rebuild on the other side goes well for you.

M.K. said...

Looks really good! I'm glad you did your homework on the roofing. I totally agree about the decline in quality products, and the reasons for it. We've always bought at bigger chain stores for the same reason - budget. But you're right that eventually a swing happens in the other direction. I look longingly at all the small stores you see in European towns. I hate WalMart :(

deborah harvey said...

it's beautiful

Little Homestead In Boise said...

Looks great and durable too!!!

Sandy said...

Leigh,

Well done, I'm impressed! Going with the heavier gauge panels will make a world of difference on the structure of your goat barn.

Cozy Thyme Cottage said...

Looks really good. I am glad you could find something local and of good quality. You guys work so hard and do a great job. Nancy

Leigh said...

Thanks! So far so good. :)

Leigh said...

I am finding that Walmart has become fairly expensive lately. Plus their supply and choice doesn't seem to be that great. For the few grocery items I need I go to Aldi now, and then pick up only a few items at Walmart if Aldi doesn't have them.

Leigh said...

Thanks! It's looking better than I pictured in my mind.

Leigh said...

Thanks! Much better than before.

Leigh said...

Yes, I'm so glad it worked out that way. We really didn't want to go with a thinner gauge and I'm glad we didn't have to.

Leigh said...

Thanks!