June 25, 2016

The Old Goat Shed: Roof It Or Lose It

Right about the time the new saw blades came in for the sawmill, we were faced with another decision to make. The tarp on the goat shed was rather in tatters, so Dan took it off. He came in to report that the roof was in worse shape than we remembered and that if we didn't do something about it we'd soon lose the building.

It leaks

Fascia boards have rotted off

The overhang we moved from the old coal barn to use as a goat
loafing area
has always leaked, Dan never could figure out why.

Covering the roof of this building was our very first outdoor homestead project. It was one of two that were built around the same time as our house, about 90 years ago. We wanted to turn half of it into a chicken coop, and the other half into a goat stall. The roof at the time had several layers on it but had started to leak. In discussing options we decided to simply tarp it for the time being. That was six years ago and the roof was long overdue for some help.

Options? We could let it go, which didn't sit well with either of us. We could tarp it again, but to be honest, we are rather tired of looking at tarps all over the place. They are on that outbuilding, cover the hay hut,


and serve as walls on the carport. They're okay for a season or two, but once they start to shred, there are bits and ribbons of poly-whatever they're made of all over the place. The other option was to put a proper roof on it.

More discussion. Should we just re-roof the existing part or do something more? I dug out one of our old goat barn plans to reconsider - Goat Barn Plan #5. That idea was to simply add another half to the shed to create a small gable barn.

I first showed these sketches to you last November, but they
are dated May 2, 2014. One of many ideas for a new goat barn.

Rough idea of the floor plan.

Dan decided to expand it a bit, coming out about five feet on the front and adding about four feet on the milking room side. Here's how it's coming along.

One of the first steps was to raise the attached loafing area roof and add
a ridge beam. A new loafing roof will extend beyond the new roof.

Framing out the new roof with posts where walls will eventually be.

For now, we're just concentrating on the roof. The rest we'll decide on later.

The only glitch we've had was in moving the hay hut. It used to be right in front of the goat shed, but it needed to be moved to work on the building. The problem was that Mama Duck was still under there. This is the same Mama Duck that had snakes getting her eggs ( see "No Hope For Ducklings?"). Since we couldn't actually see the nest, we had no idea whether or not she still had eggs. But the hay hut was in the way so it had to be moved. What happened after that is quite a story. I'll tell you all about it here.


34 comments:

  1. Tease! That roof looks very fine indeed!

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    1. The duck story will be worth the wait! And it will be a relief to get it done and not have to worry about it anymore.

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  2. That should work well. Can add the other walls as needed too!!!

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    1. Exactly! It will be useful now and useful later (assuming we get my dream barn built. :)

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  3. I just love to see buildings go up! Or . . . being added on to. Yep, roofs are so very critical to the preservation of a building. It always amazes me that they last as long as they do!

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    1. It's amazing that the tarp lasted as long as it did. The only problem is, I'll probably be picking up shreds of it from now till doomsday.

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  4. Simple genius. That is a great answer to the problem and will it ever give you more covered space. We are having the save or salvage discussion over the woodshed here. Thank you for the ideas!

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    1. It's an important discussion. It seems we can never have too much storage space, but such space is expensive to build. Sometimes repairs are a headache, but probably more economical in the long run.

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  5. It's amazing how a side project will present itself in the middle of your main one! I think your expanded barn will be worth the distraction.

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    1. We think so too, although it may take some re-figuring for the main barn because the two will come awfully close together. Dan says maybe we can connect to two for a bigger barn complex. I'm thinking open area between the buildings with a walkway. We'll see!

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  6. almost 6 years out of that tarp sounds awesome...well except for the shredded bits. Too bad the ducks don't clean up after themselves. ;) looking forward to the barn raising. :D

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    1. Very too bad the ducks don't clean up after themselves! In more ways than one! ;)

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  7. I have one of those roofs too; I'll be following this project and taking notes.

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    1. Today Dan found some really rotted roof rafters which made us stop and re-evaluate again. That part of the roof really should be rebuilt. He finally decided to roof the new half first so we could keep things under cover, then do roof the shed part. What a project this has turned out to be!

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  8. All that effort will be worth it. The promise is definitely showing already... :D

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    1. Dani, you know how it is - in the middle of it you question your sanity! Once it's done we'll be very glad for it.

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  9. the new barn addition looks great, Leigh! and i completely understand about being sick about looking at buildings covered in tarp! because we were starting from scratch - all of various sheds and barns are built out scrap and junk wood that jambaloney gets out of other people's garbage, our atv shed roof is the cap from our truck....and let's not forget 4 years of a plastic wrapped porch - bahahahahah! i hope your plans for your new barn and layout work out well and i hope you find your duck soon!

    sending much love! your friend,
    kymber

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    1. But there is something to be said for making do! Fortunately we've had to buy very little so far for the new roof. The metal panels will be about it, unless we come across a bargain to salvage.

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  10. That expansion is looking great! Excellent job! I hope Mama Duck will be okay.

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    1. Thanks! I think Mama Duck is okay, but the whole thing took a very unexpected turn.

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  11. Wow! If it is not one thing it is another for you guys! Sounds like you have it all figured out though. Waiting to hear about the duck! Nancy

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    1. Nancy, I can't wait for the day when things are peaceful and uneventful, LOL although that will probably be never!

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  12. Great progress! Will be wonderful when you're done and doing it now years later, you'll know even better how it will best meet your needs. We have no barn here at all on The Poor Farm and are getting by with very old sheds, and lots of tarps. We feel your tarp pain.

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    1. Well, Donna, you haven't had your new place as long as we've had ours, so you're allowed! It wasn't a bad choice at the time, but we shouldn't have left it on that old shed for that long!

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  13. Story of my goat life "temporarily permanent" ! Good news on the barn, roof and all.But I can't wait for the meat of the story or the Duck as it is. Staying tuned.

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    1. I figure if we waited until everything was perfect we wouldn't have any critters at all!

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  14. So you are expanding this barn, and still building the other bigger one? What will you use this one for after the new one is built?

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    1. Good question. I'd like to see this one become a proper workshop for Dan. Right now he is very make-do in the tarp covered carport (into which a lot of water drains when it rains). We can also use the storage space. A lot of our equipment is stored outside, which isn't idea. And then there's wood storage! We need more of that!

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  15. That looks great...doubled the size?
    I would think that there would be rafters needing replacement.

    I have a tarped roof(my first!), after late wet snow load bent the rafters metal shed and caved the ancient light panels 2 years ago, I could have saved it but didn't recognize the signs until later. Joist jacks and a tarp took care of it...temporarily-hehe. Replaced joist jacks with 2x2's (had to return jacks) and it'll get a new tarp, not shredded but leaking, before winter because I'm not sure how to replace a metal roof and it's mostly fencing stored in there, nothing that water can really hurt anyway.

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    1. Yes, some of the rafters will need replacing. Dan decided to roof one half at a time, to be able to keep things undercover.

      Jacks and tarps are the best first aid for old buildings!

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  16. Oh, you are going to be so delighted to have that project done and the tattered tarps gone!!

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    1. It will be lovely to have it look like a "real" building. And eventually it will get new siding and a paint job!

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