June 4, 2017

Dan's Workshop: Girders

So here's were we left off last time.

Bents are in place and temporarily braced with boards.

The next step was to put up the girders. Definitions for girders vary, but in our case the girders are support beams that go the length of the structure. There will be one on each side to hold the bents in place.

Here it is full-length on the ground next to the posts.

It is actually three pieces connected with half-lap scarf joints.

The joints are held together with pegs (trunnels). Dan used the small level
as a gauge for the drill bit, to make sure it was perpendicular to the wood.

1-inch drill bit

Both pieces drilled.

Now to get them into the notches on the top ends of the beams.

We did this one end at a time! The knee brace and ladder were handy here.

Then the other end.

First one in place and ready for the second.

After the second one is in place the two are pegged to the beam.

After everything was in place it was time for inspection.

And here's my after shot. Girders with knee braces  

Next I believe Dan wants to frame out the carport (concrete slab under the lumber pile). We are basically just replacing the original outbuilding (which we tore down before it fell down, pictures here) but with only one room instead of two and a simpler roofline. Progress has been good so far, and I hope we're able to continue making it.

Dan's Workshop: Girders © June 2017 by

28 comments:

Goatldi said...

Silly duck! Trust everything went ducky and you didn't let that avian inspector serve you with any code violations. Looks great! As I was looking and reading I was thinking that Geoffrey would love to see this post. Right up his alley doing things right and the old way. Should hold up just dandy. Big congrats !

Judy said...

Curious, is there a lap joint at each of the inside bents? And I'm assuming Dan pinned the girders to each of the bents if there wasn't a lap joint.

I think Ducky is looking for a new possible roosting spot. ;>)

Leigh said...

Dan figures it will last way longer than us! :)

Leigh said...

Those Muscovies love to roost up high!

The only lap joints for the inside bents are where the two pieces of the girder join on top of each post. The beams are secured to the posts with mortise and tenon. All joints are pinned!

Theresa said...

What a beautiful structure it is shaping up to be! Duck approved too.

Jason and Michelle said...

That is amazing.
I love that the duck is inspecting.

Rain said...

You two are awesome! I only wish I could build some kind of structure...maybe I'll try with a small shed and work my way up! Well, not now, when we buy! :)

Kaat said...

Fascinating! Love watching it come up. Are you and Dan doing all of this barn raising by yourselves?

Mrs Shoes said...

Love the old fashioned jointing - my Dad still builds this way as well.

Harry Flashman said...

that's a lot of work. The last thing like that I did was several years ago, when my wife and I put a new roof on the porch. It was August, and we roofed with sheet metal. Not fun. It is nice, though, to do it yourselves, just husband and wife.

Cozy Thyme Cottage said...

What an accomplishment doing this yourselves the old fashioned way. Must give you great satisfaction even though it is a lot of work. Nancy

1st Man said...

WOW, that is beautiful and a work of art in the craftsmanship. Well done!

Ed said...

I guess I didn't notice this in the previous posts but I went back and check and the notch that the girders set into were in all of them. What did Dan do to produce such a flat bottom on all those notches? They look cut versus chiseled but none of the pictures are really close up.

Leigh said...

Duck approved, LOL. On the other hand, it may be a duck takeover. :)

Leigh said...

Thanks!

Leigh said...

Rain, you've already shown us you have building skills! I'm guessing there's a lot of construction in your future.

Leigh said...

So far, yes! Well, us and the tractor. We'd be lost without that!

Leigh said...

It's great that the old time-honored skills are still being practiced. They give such a solid feel to the structure. I like that.

Leigh said...

Summer roofing projects are never fun! But I agree it's nice to do it yourselves as a team. It's nice to accomplish anything like that.

Leigh said...

The only "complaint" is that it's so slow going. But even conventional modern construction techniques would be, since job cuts into building time!

Leigh said...

Thanks!

Leigh said...

Ed, I had to ask! After chiseling out the notches he used a small plane to smooth them flat. The orbital sander was just a tad too large, but his plane did a nice job.

Chris said...

Awesome! Just awesome. It requires a lot of patience on both your parts, I'm sure. I love that feeling of standing back afterwards though, and admitting, "we did that". It' starts as an idea, and then takes form. So well done on the follow through! :)

Sam I Am...... said...

Your patience and diligence is amazing and I love seeing it take shape and learning a little something. It looks like he is using old fashioned methods of building? I used to watch Yankee Workshop on PBS. Doe she have a shop 'machine' that does all these things? Thank you for sharing! I find it fascinating.

Leigh said...

The worst part is having to have a full time job! It interferes with everything Dan loves to do at home. Slows things down a bit too. :)

Leigh said...

Yankee Workshop is great! Yes, he's trying to use as many traditional methods as possible. It makes sense since we have the ability to mill our own lumber. Plus there's something really neat about it. :)

withhimalone said...

That's exciting! The construction is old school lasting style and looks like fun work rather than busy work. *big smile* I'm glad you all are able to do that project and be out in nice weather together. That's wonderful for you both. *big smile* Have a great day remembering to pray always. Sincerely, Mommy of two growing blessings & so much more!

Leigh said...

Thanks! This has been a truly satisfying project. Working with natural materials and techniques, working with our hands - all very fulfilling. :)