June 2, 2009

The Hall Bathroom

Down the hallway and to the left is the hall bathroom. (See floor plan.)

There is a wonderful built-in book shelf on the left, a door to the back porch is on the right.

It was hard to photograph this room because it is so small. I like the claw foot tub. The floor is vinyl and relatively new, though not especially well laid. The walls and ceiling are beadboard, originally green (I know this from the inside of that little cabinet there).

There is a small closet is behind the door, probably added whenever the bathroom was remodeled.

There is one problem with the bathroom door. It hits the commode seat when it is opened wide. In fact the paint on the edge of the door is scraped away because of this. It makes me think that this bathroom had a different arrangement originally.

I'm guessing that both the sink and the tub are original to the house. Obviously that little cabinet is not. I'm not real keen on that medicine chest either. But, both will do for now, until we can give this room an overhaul.

It's definitely a very small bathroom. It will take some thought and planning to eventually make it more comfortable. However, it's larger than the addition bath. More on that one next....

[UPDATE: To see how updated this bathroom and incorporated it into a master suite, click here.]




7 comments:

Benita said...

I'd almost give my eye teeth for that tub!

Life Looms Large said...

Gotta love a clawfoot tub!!

Bathrooms are tricky, but you'll get it to work out!! My friend redid 2 of her three bathrooms, and they really came out great....so I know it's possible!
Good luck!

Sue

bspinner said...

Small is better than none. I LOVE your claw foot tub!!!!!!!

Jeff9 said...

One of the least expensive, yet immediately saves you money, home improvements is a bathroom bidet sprayer. The ultimate bathroom retreat is not complete without a bidet or better yet....the hand bathroom bidet sprayer. The hand sprayer gives you superior control and water volume and if the bathroom was not designed to allow for a bidet(the majority of them) it offers the convenience of installation on the existing toilet AND you don't have to get up and move every time! You will pay for it many times over in toilet paper savings. Available at www.bathroomsprayers.com Blog; http://community.greenhangout.com/_Dont-Say-It-Spray-It/blog/259546/82268.html

Theresa said...

LOL, seems like you have a new follower! You could always rehang the door to swing out. The whole bathroom function was probably carved out of space already there....Lovely tub, we have an old clawfoot
and they are wonderful for soaking in. Lucky you!

Dorothy said...

I used to have a claw foot bath in my little stone cottage, it was the most lovely and comfortable bath ever.

I didn't know that you use the word "commode" for what we call a toilet, or loo, or w.c. (water closet) which is why I had to think twice about what you mean by closet! We only use commode for the chamber pot in a seat loo for old folks who can't get to the bathroom by themselves.

I assume that this bathroom didn't always have a closet? In the UK older houses got indoor baths with taps and drainage while the loo remained out in the yard, or when they came indoors in a room of it's own, some times called "the smallest room".

Leigh said...

Thanks Benita and Barb!

Sue, thanks for the encouragement! This one will require some thinking, but we have high hopes.

Jeff, thanks for visiting and taking the time to leave a comment. We'll add that to the list of things to consider.

Theresa, I hadn't thought of that but it may be a better solution. The other idea is a pocket door.

Dorothy, interesting comment. I love learning these tidbits about homes and terminology on both sides of the pond. Actually, the more common usage would be "toilet." "Commode" is often used in polite company. "John" would be a bit cruder slang. Old time term would be the "Necessary Room."

Interesting about the loo remaining in the yard after internal updates began to appear. I've lived with outhouses before, but have to admit that nothing beats modern plumbing.