August 3, 2021

Dan's Project: Driveway Gate

 Continued from here.

One of Dan's summer projects is done at last - a gate for the driveway. As with most projects, it turned out to be more than simply putting up a gate. We tied the gate into another project - window pergolas for homegrown shade. The first pergola was finished in this post; then he started on the gate. We discussed  options and decided that using materials similar to the pergola and existing privacy fence would give the most pleasing aesthetic. We also discussed one large gate versus two half gates, and Dan chose to build  half gates. 

Privacy fence panels that need to be used.

For his materials, he pulled out a couple of privacy fence panels we bought several years ago. They've been stored under a tarp and need to be used. He also had some trellis similar to what he used on the pergola.


Here's what he came up with.



There was some unnecessary excitement to make the build memorable. Dan had set up his table saw and saw horses in the shade between his workshop and the goat barn. Unfortunately, we discovered we have some ground bees nesting under the concrete slab on which the milking room is built. They did not like the noise of the table saw! Dan had a couple of them attack him when he was using it and chase him back to the house! They were on guard for several days afterward, which was a nuisance. Dan set up a different work area after that and they left him alone.


The first gate required a lot of think time, but the second was made fairly quickly. Then came hanging them.

front side

One of the reasons he chose to make two half gates was because of weight. Then, because one of the pergola posts also served as a gate post, a gate wheel was installed to additionally support the weight of that half of the gate.


back side


Eventually, we'll get the second pergola done. For now, Dan has already moved on to working on his other summer project, the outdoor kitchen. So the other pergola will have to wait. At least we can keep stray dogs out of the back yard and away from our poultry now.

Dan's Project: Driveway Gate © August 2021 

34 comments:

  1. Stunning - well done both of you.

    Also having a bee problem at the mo' - they're swarming due to the canola (rapeseed) flowers in the farmers neighbouring fields. A bit too close to the chickens, and I fear for our dogs, so I'm currently enquiring about bee removal services. Problem is, the beekeepers are all busy as it is "bee season" from now until the end of October. Not sure my nerves will last that long...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dani! How lovely to hear from you! I've missed your blog. This seems to be a bad year for stinging and biting insects. :(

      Delete
  2. Had yellow jackets living in the attic at last residents. The landladys dad was entomologist an said just puffing a little pyrethryn dust (or sevin dust) in the entrance at night when they were roosting with minimal disturbance would take care of it with the least amount of cost/swarming. I did wear long sleeves and screen over my face when applying it. Didn't disturb them an they were dead/gone in 3-4 days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Annie, thank you for that! I'll have to see if I can find some locally. Would sure beat the other kinds of sprays.

      Delete
  3. First, that gate looks GREAT! Dan (and you!) do such lovely work.

    Second, we have a ground bee issue as well! Ours is under an old landscape timber in our 2 acre back yard where our dogs run. Our "puppy" a 9 month old Doberman discovered them a few weeks ago. I was still out in the front yard home from a grocery run into town, my hubby had gone in to let the dogs out and as he came back out the front door we heard the most horrific dog screaming. I was sure she'd broken a leg or something terrible. Scurried back through the house and saw her biting at her side and belly, and HEARD the bees swarming around their hole. I grabbed a few plantain leaves from a flower bed outside the back door - an area the dogs stay out of, chewed them up a bit and with my hubby holding the puppy, managed to hold the chewed up leaves on the 3 spots which she was worrying. She immediately stopped fussing, and the swelling stopped increasing.

    I still haven't dealt with the bees, but the dogs avoid that area. The bees were a tad annoyed when I mowed nearby and the mower kicked cut grass onto their nest last night. MANY came swarming out, so i'm going to have to do something soon. I know I don't have any sevin or other chemicals here, but I plan to pick some up next trip into town. Thanks for the tip Annie!

    Shelley

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shelley, your poor puppy! Good call on the plantain! I'd forgotten about those. One of our cats inadvertently laid down in front of the ground bee entrance and got chased off. He avoids the area now. We mostly just avoid known ground bee nests, but sometimes they put themselves in truly inconvenient places.

      Delete
  4. Nicely done! It's a nice complement to the pergola.

    An organic way to deal with yellow jackets or stinging insects that nest under ground is to place a clear jar or bowl on top of the nest when they are dormant and place soil around the rim to seal it. Within a few days, the nest should be done for and the bees on the outside of the hole will have to find a new nest elsewhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daisy, good tip about the jar or bowl - for those brave enough to go near the nest even when dormant! The nest under the milking room slab is tricky because it's hidden behind a ridge of concrete from when the slab was poured. I'll remember your tip for future reference, however.

      Delete
  5. For most of the post, I thought you were referring to a gate at the intersection of your driveway and the road for unwanted traffic but with the last bit, I see that it is more of a critter gate. Looks very pleasing to the eye compared to the standard metal tube gates everyone uses these days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed, I always wonder if I'm writing clearly enough to create the right mental picture! Photos do help here. I told Dan he could go with a tube gate if he wanted, but I'm really glad he decided to make one instead.

      Delete
  6. Wowsers! Lovely gate I love wooden gates I really do.Geoffrey used to make our gates for all of the enclosures for the critters out of wood it took a little bit longer but it’s nice.

    I’m no fan of what we call meat bees out here which are actually a variety of wasp and they’re called meat because they eat meat. I don’t know if you have them back there or not. And I mean as in on your legs your arms any place they can get and they bite like heck and it hurts don’t ask me how I know. I’m glad he got out of there without any great bodily injury.

    Looking forward to seeing the summer kitchen maybe I can do some plagiarism on my mine next summer after looking at yours lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Goatldi, we have a lot of Dan's homemade wooden gates as well. They really do look nice.

      Dan's had some challenges with the outdoor kitchen stove, which I'll share in an upcoming post! Right now we're waiting on the firebox and oven doors; then he can finish the brickwork. I'm looking forward to giving it a try!

      Delete
  7. Lovely workmanship as always! I assume you'll need to install something in that gap between pergola post and house so a dog can't slip through there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michelle, yes! There are still some gaps to deal with, although for the moment, no dogs are trying to visit.

      Delete
  8. I used to have ground bees under the front yard sidewalk, but haven't seen them this year. They were always completely docile and weren't even bothered by mowing.

    Of course, I didn't go looking for trouble by running a saw nearby. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tpals, ground bees seem to change their nest location every year. Mostly, we just give them plenty of space, but the ones under the milking room aren't the striped kind. They look more like miniature carpenter bees, but are quite aggressive. Not sure if they'll move next year without our encouragement!

      Delete
    2. How could you encourage (humanly) ground bees iffn' they don't want to move?

      Delete
    3. Kev, by humanely you mean without killing any? I don't know. The striped kind seem to change locations every year, so just avoiding disturbing the nest works there. We've seen the remains of nests that skunks have dug up. But I'm sure there was some loss of bees there! The kind under the milking room slab are different than we've seen before. It's hard to get close to the entrance without getting attacked. Even if we wanted to spray poison, it's in a very awkward spot to get to. We'll have to wait and see if they move on next year.

      Delete
  9. I read first as "Dam Project" and immediately thought "Dear Lord, Dan has upped his game by 100%". But then re-read the title.

    The gates look wonderful. I did wonder about the hanging of them based on the weight. The wheels are a good call. Hopefully this will keep the critters in/out as necessary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL. Titles can be tricksy, TB. :)

      Seems like all of our gates need regular adjusting. Hopefully, the gate wheel will help!

      Delete
  10. Dan is a nifty guy to have around for a whole lot of reasons, huh? Hope the invading dogs can't slither under.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A little dog, maybe! Most of our culprits have been big dogs, however. What can slip under the gate are skunks! We have regular skunk visitors who are completely undeterred by fences and gates!

      Delete
  11. That is coming together nicely Leigh, lucky to have a talented husband. Now, do you rent him out?

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm thinking, too, that you should get those little "slip in" areas taken care of PDQ. Those darn neighborhood dogs have already done to much damage on your property. Gosh, that gate is attractive!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mama Pea, thank you! I know we won't be able to block out all predators, but the gate definitely helps.

      Delete
  13. That looks GREAT Leigh!!! What a brilliant job...you both are so inspiring to me! :) ♥

    ReplyDelete
  14. That gate looks beautiful. Your house looks so very attractive from all the work you have done. It is quite the change from the original!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rosalea, thank you! Yes, it's a very different looking house!

      Delete

Welcome to 5 Acres & A Dream The Blog! Thank you for taking the time to join in the conversation.