January 1, 2021

Buck Shelter Demolition

The buck shelter has been a feature on our homestead since 2013. Hard to believe it's been that long! But with the building of a new shelter, the old is coming down. Two reasons: to reuse the wood for the new shelter, plus the roof leaks. Dan's current nice weather project has been to disassemble it.




All that's left is straw bedding and the privacy fence panels that made the back of the shelter. The rest of the materials will be re-used in the new buck barn. 



Even the hay feeder will find new life as a portable feeder. All it needs is the roof extended some and wheels or ???


It's really nice to have all those materials to re-use. I'll show you how it's coming along, next time. 

17 comments:

  1. Awesome Leigh! Can’t wait to see the reuse Of those wonderful materials !

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  2. We'll be waiting. Hope your coming year is a productive one.

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  3. Thanks Wyomingheart! So nice to have them to use. :)

    Thank you Gorges! Let's hope the coming year is better for all of us.

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  4. Renewed life in used stuff. Nice!

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  5. Great reuse of materials. That Dan is a veritable Prometheus indeed.

    A Happy and Blessed New Year (because, frankly, we could all use one).

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  6. Happy New Year Leigh! :) I'm looking forward to see the new shelter!!

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  7. Looking good Leigh!

    Be watching for updates as they come along. Where are the boys staying in the interim?

    I believe you mentioned it before but it is nowhere in my memory banks at this point.

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  8. Jo, it's the best way to go. :)

    TB, thanks! And amen on needing a happy and blessed new year!!!!

    Rain, happy new year to you too!

    Goatldi, thank you! In the 4th and 6th photos, you can see a small outbuilding in the background. That's our original buck barn! It has some drainage issues, but as long as that's tended to, it still makes a nice shelter for the bucks.

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  9. I know the photos make it look so easy, but I also know in reality, it takes a truckload of work too! I'm sure the tractor got a workout, moving all those pieces of wood to their new location. It reminds me of my incredibly long chicken coop renovation. I started it, dragged my tail a bit with the design, then COVID hit and chickens became impossible to find. So it stalled some more, then summer came and I couldn't work in the heat. Then the proverbial Christmas came, lol. Now I'm just waiting for the rain to leave, so I can get the roof on.

    But isn't that just the way it goes. So when I read said Dan had some good weather to work in, I was like: oh yes, aren't those hard to find, lol? Can't wait for the progress to happen, as you're both able to make it. Happy New year to you, the critters and your five acres.

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  10. A picture is worth a thousand words! And all your pictures sure make for an interesting post. With the price of lumber today, one can hardly NOT reuse anything reusable! I'll be looking forward to your documentation of the new structure. Happy New Year to you and Dan and happy new buck quarters for the bucks!

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  11. Chris, happily, it went faster than we were afraid it might. But you're right, so many things can cause a project to stall out. I think our nice weather is over for awhile, though! Over two inches of rain today and more in the forecast.

    Mama Pea, thanks! Seems pictures are easier these days than explanations. :)

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  12. Wonderful that the weather cooperated so that you could cross this task off the list! Look forward to all of your posts in the new year.
    Be Blissed!

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  13. Great idea! We did that when we built her coop, use lots of recycled materials, some of which we found for free Or bought really cheap. Looking forward to the new completed design Wish we had mild weather here it snowed this morning just a bit

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  14. Daisy, got to grab good weather in winter whenever you can get it! :)

    Nancy, it's truly rewarding to build like that, isn't it? Hopefully, we'll have more cooperative weather, so we can get this project done.

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  15. Back in the late 80's in the aftermath of the farm crisis, I spent many many summers tearing down farm buildings on deserted farms for lumber and we used that salvaged lumber probably for nearly two decades. It was so incredibly convenient to just go out to the "lumber building" and grab what you needed as projects came up. Unfortunately all of that is long gone these days so we have to resort to sorting through piles of twisted new stuff at big box stores like most everyone else.

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  16. Ed, it's really a shame when the stuff from the store is in worse shape than the old stuff from deconstructed buildings.

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  17. I once tore down a corn crib made from actual 2x4 sized slats and 2x16 boards some 20 feet long, ALL of which was solid oak. Years later we went to raise a building up eight feet so that we could put larger farm equipment in it and used those oak boards in the process. We found that there wasn't anyone who could pound a nail or drive a screw into it. It was just so hard it wasn't possible. We ended up having to predrill every single nail hole. That shed while no longer used for farming equipment, holds our gardening stuff now and I have no doubt that oak lumber will outlive me.

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