February 11, 2020

Kidding Has Commenced!

Daisy was due to kid next Friday, but on Sunday I found her looking like she was in the first stages of labor. Into the kidding stall she went.


For goats, it's a challenge to tell about early labor since they don't announce, "I'm having contractions!" It's up to the goatkeeper to figure it out. Clues include suddenly full udder, discharge (especially blood-tinged), separating herself from the others, unwillingness to leave the barn, standing in one place, shifting weight, and looking like she's concentrating. Her tail rises with each contraction. Daisy showed all these signs. A couple of hours later...

A buckling first. Delivery was classic textbook.

Second was a little doeling (right), also a textbook delivery.

Third was another buckling (right). His head and one
leg were tucked behind, so he needed a little help.

The last one popped out easily; another buckling (center).

That makes Daisy's total to be three boys and one girl. Not my preferred outcome, but I'm glad they're all healthy. Daisy is an excellent mother and a heavy producer, so I have no doubt she'll be able to feed them all.

The next day...

Everybody's doing fine

and knows how to find milk. 

I was very glad she kidded during the day. Makes it warmer and easier.

Next due date is March 1st.

Kidding Has Commenced! © February 2020

27 comments:

Judy said...

So cute. Glad everything went well. Love the sweaters

Jean said...

AWWW!

susie @ persimmon moon cottage said...

Oh,you're kidding, 4 kids at a time! I never knew they had that many at a time. Those bucklings and doeling are so adorable, especially in their little sweaters.

Leigh said...

Thank you everybody! Susie, I think twins are the most common in the goat world, but Kinders tend toward multiples, so quads aren't that rare. This is Daisy's third kidding. She had quads the first time, triplets last year, and four again. this year. Fortunately, she produces plenty of milk to feed them all.

tpals said...

Congrats! What a sweet mama.

Boud said...

I guess spring must be here. Four beauties. And so chic in their sweaters. Did you make them?

Leigh said...

tpals, thanks! Daisy is a very good mama and a sweet goat. :)

Boud, yes, I did make their sweaters! A lot of fun knitting went into them. I need to make another batch, however, because I used a pattern for standard size goat kids for the striped ones. Kinders are mid-size goats, so their kids are smaller than standards. Most of those sweaters are too big. The yellow one was adapted from an extra-small dog sweater pattern. It fits the best, but I the pattern wasn't well written and difficult to follow.

Retired Knitter said...

Wow, I am with Susie. I was surprised by 4!! But they are all so cute. I guess you can have only so many males. In fact, with all the extra mouths to feed down the road, do you sell some off? The sweaters are cute. Good thing. February and March can be so cold.

Ed said...

I hate to admit it after all the "persuasion" my parents had to use to get me out to the gestation barn, but I miss the birthing process of farm animals. It's a neat thing to witness life coming into the world.

Leigh said...

RT, quads are unusual for most breeds of goats, but not Kinders! I planned the breeding to be in milder months, although I still left a heat lamp in the kidding stall the first night because it was so damp and cold. Even with their sweaters they were still shivering, but they hadn't dried off completely either. The next day it "warmed" up and today they don't need their sweaters!

I sell most of the kids and only keep one or two each year. I can only keep so many because our pastures are small. Because the breed is in demand, I usually have a waiting list for kids, although most people want does rather than bucks. Last year, two sales for bucklings fell through, so I still have too many bucks. My idea number is two or three, but I have five! If they don't sell, we use them for meat.

Ed, it truly is one of those happy miracles of life. Occasionally, it can be sad if there is a death, but those are rare. New farm babies are so much fun to watch. Today, Daisy's kids are getting their "sea legs" and beginning to bounce around. Such a joy.

Caroline J. Baines said...

Awesome! Congratulations.

Sam I Am...... said...

Congratulations! They are so precious! Did you knit the sweaters for them? They're cute too! Congratulations to Daisy too for doing such a good job and taking such great care of her babies! She's lucky to have you as a backup and midwife too!

Hill Top Post said...

Oh, so sweet!!! What a beautiful and good mommy! I love the sweaters!

Susan said...

There is not much cuter than a kid in a sweater. Glad the deliveries were easy and congratulations to you and Daisy on four healthy, darling kids!

Mama Pea said...

The picture of the four of them snuggled together in their hand knit sweater coats is so precious that it looks as if it were staged. Glad you were there to help the one with the turned back head and leg wiggle on out! Congratulations to all involved.

Chris said...

Instant family, lol. Four little rugrats. Cute as can be! Especially with their little jackets, you've made them. Glad Daisy delivered well, despite the wet conditions you've experienced lately. I know the buck barn was flooded. But was the Doe shelter, effected? I feel I should go back to the flooding post, as you may have already shared that.

Leigh said...

Caroline, thanks!

Sam, yes, I knitted them. I really need to make more in smaller sizes. The Kinder babies are smaller than standard size goat babies. :)

Mary, thank you!

Mama Pea, that's why I always want to be on hand for deliveries. Most of the time it goes well, but every now and then they need help, especially with multiples. It must be easy to get tangled up in there with that many!

Chris, Daisy is very happy with her little crew! The does and chickens were all fine, being on higher ground. It was only the boys who had a rough time of it. As soon as they were on high ground they were happy again. We had two more inches of rain today, but no repeat performance of the flooding. Just a few large puddles out in that pasture.

Debby Riddle said...

I think I remember you highlighting Daisy. She looks like a great goat! I never had quads! I know they are common with Kinders. Best of luck. Stay dry!

Cockeyed Jo said...

Congrats on the new kids.

Leigh said...

Debby, I'm surprised you never had the joy of quads! Instant play group. Daisy really is a great goat. This is her third freshening: quads her first and trips her second. She's an excellent producer and has a good personality too!

Jo, thanks!

Nancy @ Little Homestead In Boise said...

Congtats!!! How cute in their sweaters. Ah..



Leigh said...

Nancy, thanks!

Quinn said...

Always a relief when they are safe on the ground, isn;t it, Leigh? Well done, Mamagoat. I'll be enjoying vicarious kidding this year - in fact, it's very possible I won't be breeding here again - I'm at capacity and I'd have to cull before breeding.
I'll miss that magical first three weeks of baby goats experiencing the world - the highlight and reward for any goatherd, I think. I'll still be doing all the herding, though, so I guess I'll try to think up some other highlight and reward? Suggestions welcome!

Leigh said...

Quinn, those first three weeks are truly the most fun time. Kinda sad to not have kids this year, but I get it about numbers and capacity. I'm always having to decide who goes and who stays. It's the hardest thing I do.

CityCreekCountryRoad said...

There is nothing better than new life (and goats in sweaters)!

City Creek Country Road

Leigh said...

City Creek Country Road, it's one of the best times of the year!

Madness, Trouble, Squish and Milkbone said...

Oh I always have to comment when there are goat babies! So cute!