September 12, 2016

Little Barn: Doors and Walls

Dan's been working on the walls and doors for the Little Barn. We're not exactly doing things in order, but here's where things stand at the moment.

Doors for the hay mow went up first. Originally we planned a sliding door (or doors) like we did for the chicken coop. But Dan had the old door from the original shed, so he used it for one side of a double door for the hay storage area and made the second door to match.

Double doors open wide for filling with hay.

This is the original shed with its original door. The shed became
our first chicken coop (on the left) and goat shed (on the right). 

A closer look. Once painted they'll look almost identical
except for the raggedy worn bottom on the original door.

The front wall was next.


Then the Dutch (stable) door into the feed area and milking room, also the wall down the side.


The feed room door was made to match the hay doors.


View from the side...

A sliding door will complete the wall under the overhang.
A rain catchment tank will be connected to the downspout.

And the back...


Inside view.


Still to replace will be the original back wall of the original shed.


Then windows, battens, and paint. We've made a lot of progress, but it seems like we still have a long way to go.

Little Barn: Doors and Walls © September 2016

19 comments:

  1. Leigh absolutely lovely! You will love your dutch door also. I had one in the last barn before where we are now that went to the loafing area from the milk stands and kidding pens inside the barn. I loved being able to leave the top open to get quick peeks on everyone any time day or night. Enjoy!

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    1. Thanks! It's a relief in so many ways to have this building .

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  2. What amazing progress! It will be gorgeous when it is all painted!

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    1. I just started working on the paint. It definitely adds a finished look to it.

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  3. Great-looking building and how cute are all those chickens walking about. :)

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  4. It is remarkable how much you have done....but there is always more to do isn't there? How did Dan brace the doors when he made them...great photos of the outside of the doors but do you have any of the back? We have to build 4 doors for the tobacco barn here and ideas are much needed. Your improvements are such a huge help!

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    1. Fiona, Dan is getting ready to get started on the sliding door. I'll take lots of photos and include some of the door he's already done. Hopefully that will give you some ideas.

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  5. Great progress and the doors look awesome. Trying to understand the back section. It that where the sliding door will go? Do you normally lock the goats in at night?

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    1. Perry, yes, the sliding door will cover that large open area in the back. No, I don't usually lock the goats in for the night, but I like having the option to do so. We've never had a problem with coyotes or stray dogs, but both are in the area and if we did have a problem, I would close in the goats for the night.

      The other reason I wanted a door instead of a gate is for stormy winter weather, especially blowing winds. Goats need fresh air, but they don't need drafts. My old goat shed had an open section with a gate, and I had a hard time keeping my goats protected from drafts, especially when the wind is whipping around from several different directions. This is especially important during kidding in cold months. Until the kids are dry and nursing well, there is a chance they can suffer, even die, from hypothermia. Being able to close the barn will help with that.

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    2. Makes complete sense, thanks for all the info as always!

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  6. Dan does great work and I love the recycling!

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    1. It's fun to incorporate some of the old with the new. It gives a sense of connection from one to the other.

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  7. Y'all are always so inspiring to those of us out here. Just wonderful work!!

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  8. Looking terrific. I know what you mean about getting there. When reusing old materials, there's often a lot of jiggery pokery involved. There's removing it, then repositioning hinges, or possibility changing them out altogether. Which you won't know, until you take the door out to rehang it somewhere else. Which might mean an extra trip to the store, after you've spent half an hour to an hour, checking around your supplies for a solution.

    I recently re-built a chicken tractor, which is how I know. And that baby, had an incredibly small footprint, compared to your goat barn. After a week, working full time hours on it, I feel your pain and fatigue.

    But you WILL get there. :)

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    1. Chris that is so true, but I think in the end it is so worth it. It's definitely a plus not to have to buy new materials, and I think the old give true personality and character to new buildings. We're hoping to do something similar with the windows. :)

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  9. Wow - Looking great. You two should be very proud of your handiwork. While sweating away finishing the building and painting, keep in mind how much better winter chores will be this year.


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