July 22, 2016

Colby


Colby, as in my newest buckling, because when I think of Wisconsin I think of dairy country and cheese. While "Cheddar" didn't seem like a good name for a goat, "Colby" seemed like a fine name. Why did I want a Wisconsin name? Because that's where Colby came from.


He arrived last Sunday, having come by way of Illinois. Last summer I bought three Kinder doelings from Kelsee and Lisa of Kinder Korner in Illinois.


When I heard Kelsee was heading my way once again to deliver more goats, I asked her about bucklings. It doesn't take long for a small herd like mine to become closely related. That means new genetics from time to time are important.


Long story short, Kelsee was heading to Wisconsin to pick up a buckling and suggested I contact the same folks to see if another was available. There was!


Colby is three months old and wondering where familiar goats and places are. He's very cautious of me but not afraid. One of my home-born bucklings (Thunder) went to a new home the next day, so Lightning is happy for the company. Clark is more interested in the does and not impressed.

My Billy Boys: Clark, Lightning, and Colby.

Some of the doelings are heading to new homes as well; it's that time of year. Soon we'll settle down to winter numbers and start planning for next year's kidding season. I love living by the rhythms of the year.

Colby © July 2016 by Leigh at

28 comments:

  1. So nice! I was just thinking yesterday about getting my numbers back down. My lead ewe has wool that is not particularly nice and I am feeling like I have too many animals. It settles down when they don't go out to eat.

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    1. Goals! Breeding goals truly help with the decision making. If you're going for a particular kind and quality of fleece, then those are the sheep you keep.

      My goals have to do with a number of things including conformation, so it gets tricky, especially when trying to choose kids. They don't always grow up the way you think they will! Keeps things challenging.

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  2. Aww cute. He looks like my Jerry, but with those irksome extra parts. :-)

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    1. Let me guess, the same irksome extra parts I bought Colby for? ;)

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    2. So, are the offspring going to have cheese names?
      Brie? Muenster? Fontina and Jack?

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    3. Good question. I haven't thought too far ahead on that, but naming is fun, especially when there can be takeoffs on parents' names. I've already thought of "Lightning Storm" (Stormy) and "April Sky." Who knows? I can definitely see a "Colby Jack!"

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  3. I used to breed cattle and horses and to me breeding them makes the offspring like Christmas presents....you have to wait but the arrival is so exciting! He looks good and what a great color. Is he registered?

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    1. It is a lot of fun, isn't it? Especially when there are so many potential colors and markings to add to the surprise element.

      Colby is eligible to be registered. I have all the paperwork from the breeder with only a few boxes to fill in. I also need a decent photo of him to send in with the application.

      For Kinders, they have to be registered to be "real" Kinders. The Association trademarked the name awhile back, so to be able to call a goat a Kinder it has to be registered (or eligible to be registered). Otherwise they are "Kinder types", or for a first generation, just a Nubian/Pygmy cross.

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  4. Colby is quite handsome, love the name!

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  5. I like the name Colby, but I prefer sharp cheddar cheese. ;) I don't envy you trying to figure out who stays and who goes. It seems like it is all working out for you now. When my mom was breeding dogs she kept inbreeding and I think someone gave her bad advise (the breeder who sold her the dams). She never had a litter that was any good. :-/ She got out of it when she divorced my father, but several years ago bought a new dog in hopes of starting up again. I don't know what convinced her not to do it. I'm just glad she had her fixed.

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    1. I like any cheese, but the name "Colby" sounded better than Cheddar. :)

      Goat breeders sometimes inbreed, but more often line breeding or outcrossing. I once read a question about breeding a buckling to his mother. The answer was that unless the owner absolutely loved everything about the dam, to not do it. Most goat breeders like to leave at least a generation or two in between. Still, it can keep the good qualities in a herd, but it can also pull out the bad qualities! I'm still looking to improve specific traits, however, so I'm looking for better breeding partners.

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  6. I have to say I'm terribly envious!!! I really cannot wait until my dreams become a reality with regards to my future homestead...I've been working on it for seven years now, three to go (hopefully), but life always gets in the way...until then I will enjoy all of your posts, oh, the goats are wonderful. I love Colby cheese :)

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    1. Oh Rain, life always gets in the way, doesn't it? Good for you for sticking to your goal. When you get there, you'll be glad you did.

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  7. A good looking boy Colby is! And I do like the name. Much better than Emmenthaler! ;o)

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    1. That would be a mouthful! Of course, that's a Switzerland originating cheese, whereas Colby was actually invented in Wisconsin. :)

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  8. Nice looking young man. Glad you didn't name his Swiss.

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    1. LOL. Swiss or Swissy wouldn't cut it around here. :)

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  9. I ot two black nubian bucks years ago, hoping they would keep the grass in my meadow mowed down. But they ate the side of my house, parts of my truck, and most of my wife's flowers. I gave them to an old guy who had a petting zoo and who promised not to sell them to the Mexicans to eat. When I see your goats I often think of the "goat buddies". I liked them, they just were so destructive.

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    1. Unfortunately goats can be very destructive, some more than others. Good fencing helps, but we've had a persistent few who eventually had to be rehomed. I won't keep a disruptive goat.

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  10. Those ears! They look like Lamb's Ears (plant) - so soft. But it surprises me that they're white, rather than tan. He's adorable!

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    1. Actually a lot of my Kinders have white ears, or usually what they call "frosted," which are a mix of white and some color. They really add some pizzazz to their markings. :)

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  11. Colby's a handsome young man - and I love the name you picked!

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    1. The name was Dan's idea. We were brainstorming Wisconsin names and he came up with "Colby!" It was instantly right. :)

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  12. Hope he and Lightening become good friends. "Welcome, Colby"

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  13. He's got a cute name and a sweet face! Happy for you!

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