September 30, 2018

Photo Wrap-Up for September

It's the last day of September! Here's a look back to wrap it up. 

Sam

Blue mistflower

Cushaws

Cushaw pie (tastes like pumpkin)

Fancy bindweed aka morning glory
on Jerusalem artichokes.

Fancy bindweed on corn.

Dehydrated okra

September salad: fresh daikon greens, baby daikon
radishes, tomato, hard boiled egg, and feta cheese.


Cantaloupe

Window progress on the barn

First hint of fall color

Firewood

Photo Wrap-Up for September © Sept. 2018 by

12 comments:

Mama Pea said...

Gorgeous, every picture! The snaps of food made my tummy growl as I haven't fixed breakfast yet . . . although there are fresh-out-of-the-oven applesauce muffins cooling on the counter. The picture of your dried okra made me think that I always want to leave jars of dried foods out where they can be seen (rather than stashed in a dark cabinet where they should be) because they're so attractive to the eye!

Fiona said...

Your barn quilt square is so perfect and what a wonderful trip around your fall farm.

Toirdhealbheach Beucail said...

Lovely, Leigh. Thank you. I especially enjoy the picture of Sam.

Michelle said...

Beautiful scenes. I confess I like Morning Glory (bindweed), but it can make a real mess of things.

Leigh said...

Mama Pea, thanks! I agree about dried foods being pretty. I vacuum seal all of them so that should help. Nice to leave a few things around to admire though. Your applesauce muffins sound yummy!

Fiona, the barn quilt was something I'm glad we added. A very cheerful touch!

TB, thanks! Sam was nicely cooperative that day. :)

Michelle, thanks! I like morning glories too, but I just have too many of them in the garden!

Mike said...

Sam, he certainly looks in control of everything below him!
Did Dan have a chance to install the rain gauge yet?

Cockeyed Homestead said...

Tis the season for firewood. Again.

Ed said...

Never had a cushaw. We have been raising Hubbards which have a real creamy consistency and make excellent pies but are real thicked skin and large which makes them hard to process. How is the texture of a cushaw? I would prefer something smaller like them if they too would make great pies.

Leigh said...

Mike, yes! Dan installed the rain gauge first thing! I need to get some pictures. :)

Jo, funny how it comes around the same time each year, lol.

Ed, I've never had a Hubbard, so I don't know how to compare. I never seem to have success with pumpkins, but cushaws do very well for me. They can grow larger than 20 pounds, but this years have been moderate in size. I have to use a large knife to cut them open, but it isn't too bad. Usually I cut into sections, scrape out the seeds, then steam until the flesh is tender. Then I scrape it from the skin and run it through my Foley to make sure it's a nice even texture. Well worth a try!

Kev Alviti said...

Lovely pictures. That firewood one is an important one. Not long now till fires everyday and all that hard work will be paying off!

Kelly said...

Loving all your September photos! I'm intrigued by the dehydrated okra. How do you use that throughout the year? Your Sam is beautiful and totally different from the Sam at my house (a black mutt with brown markings).

Leigh said...

Kev, leaning into cooler days certainly seems to motivate in the firewood direction!

Kelly, this is the first time I've dehydrated okra, and I think I will probably add it to soups. I usually slice and freeze it to oven fry, but once I got a lot in my freezer I had to do something with it! It's been a prolific okra year for us.